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Antioxidants Healthy Sleep Life Balance

How to Achieve Healthy Restorative Sleep

RKMD Blog May 31, 2016
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We all sleep, but is it healthy sleep? You may be surprised to learn that according to research by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and the National Sleep Foundation, unhealthy sleep behaviors of adults in the U.S. are now a public health concern. Approximately 35% of those surveyed reported insufficient sleep (less than 6 hours) and 62% said that they experience a sleep problem several nights a week. An estimated 40-70 million Americans suffer from sleep or wakefulness disorders.

Unhealthy sleep patterns increase the risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, kidney disease, obesity, and depression.  They have been linked to traffic accidents, occupational hazards and reduced productivity.  Factors contributing to poor sleep hygiene include 24-hour access to media and technology, unconventional work schedules, and medical issues such as chronic pain or obstructive sleep apnea.

Healthy sleep is vital to good health and emotional well-being:

  • You fall asleep easily.
  • You regularly sleep 7 to 9 hours in a 24 hour period (sometimes including a nap) without long periods of wakefulness.
  • Upon waking, you feel refreshed and alert.

During sleep, our brains are active and our bodies replenish themselves. There are five stages of sleep: stage 1 is light sleep; in stage 2 the brain waves are slower; stages 3 and 4 are deep sleep; and stage 5 is REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep, when breathing and heart rate increase, blood pressure rises, and we dream.  This cycle takes 90 to 110 minutes and repeats three to five times a night for healthy sleep. Most adults experience occasional insomnia, due to stress or worry or excitement, but if you are frequently unable to fall asleep or stay asleep, or if you suspect that your sleep insufficiency is related to a medical issue (e.g., if you snore loudly or stop breathing regularly in your sleep,) your doctor may order a sleep study or other tests to determine a course of treatment. If you find yourself feeling stressed or anxious and you just can’t quiet your thinking, here are some  things you can do to promote relaxation and restful sleep.

Before bed:

  • Diet: Refrain from heavy meals, alcohol and caffeine two to three hours before bedtime.
  • Environment and Light: Turn off TVs, computers and other electronic devices that give off light. An exception may be made for atmospheric sound machines or soft, soothing background music that can mask environmental noise and promote relaxation.
  • Adult coloring books, journaling and creative writing provide opportunities to relax and engage in satisfying and creative activities.
  • Tai chi, also called movement meditation, has been found to be effective in achieving a relaxed state prior to sleep.

At bedtime:

  • “The 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise” may not put you to sleep in 60 seconds, but it really does promote relaxation and a calm feeling.
  • See: http://www.medicaldaily.com/life-hack-sleep-4-7-8-breathing-exercise-will-supposedly-put-you-sleep-just-60-332122

What are your favorite tips for improving the quality of your sleep?  Leave us a comment or share a link to some online resources, and help everyone train healthy sleeping habits for improved wellness.

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