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Allergies, Antioxidants, Dr. Robert Keller, Health
Life with allergies can be hard, and uncomfortable.  Depending on the season and where you live, there can be any number of triggers waiting for you outside during the day, and even more when you return home in the evening. Did you know that there are a number of simple, easy things you can do daily to reduce the number of allergic triggers there are in your home?  If you have allergies, or know someone who suffers through aggravating symptoms, share these tips to help them reduce reoccurring reactions.

1. Take a Shower Daily
One of the best things that a personal with seasonal allergies can do is to take a shower immediately after you return from the outdoors.  Don’t wait and relax first, as allergens hitchhike their way into your home on soft surfaces, including clothing, hair and skin.   Head to the bathroom and rinse off, to eliminate allergies that have accumulated throughout the day.

2. Manage Dirty Laundry
Doing a load of laundry isn’t high on everyone’s priority list, particularly after a long work day.  But where you keep your laundry can have a tremendous impact on the air quality of your home.  A reminder that soft surfaces including your clothing accumulate allergens throughout the day, so storing your dirty clothes in your bedroom is not the best idea.   Keep a basket in the laundry room or in another place, to avoid breathing in allergens all night.

3. Ditch the Carpet Where possible, avoid living in areas that have carpeting.  Each fiber of carpeted flooring acts as a sponge that traps allergens, and retains them.  Carpets are bad news for allergy suffers, as they increase the allergen load over time to reduce your interior air quality, and condense allergens that will trigger histamine production in the body.  Tile and wood floors will help allergy sufferer’s breath more easily.

4. Avoid Open Windows While it’s nice to allow some fresh air in, if you suffer from allergies, opening your windows on a nice day can also invite pollen, dander, dust mites and other elements that will trigger your symptoms.  A HEPA filter fan is a great investment.  Not only does it create the same air movement that is relaxing and pleasant during warmer months, it also helps improve the air quality of your home by catching and trapping allergens.  (Remember to wear a dust mask when changing your filter).

5. Pets and Allergies Many people with allergies choose not to have pets, to help moderate their symptoms.  However, people with allergies and a love for domesticated pets like dogs, cats or birds can reduce allergic triggers by reducing dander.  This means washing your pet and rinsing them thoroughly on a weekly basis.    Brushing your pet outside can also help reduce the amount of dander (pet dandruff) that is tracked into your home.

6. De-Clutter for Dust The more interior decorations you have, the more places there are for dust to build up (even with frequent cleaning).   Reduce your accessories to make it easier to clean your living space more frequently (without having to move items), and breathe easier.

7. Patrol for Mold Mold is one of the most frequent allergens found in a home, and it can hide in places that you might not think of.   Bathroom cleansing spray can help eliminate and prevent mold on tiles, in the shower or around the sink or bathtub.  Also spray cleanser on your garbage can, around your door frames and in your garbage disposal or sink drain weekly, to prohibit the growth of mold in moist areas.   Avoid over watering house plants; while plants are excellent filters and improve air quality, wet soil rapidly grows mold, contributing to allergic reactions. If you are tired of being caught between your allergy symptoms and over the counter medications for seasonal allergies, which leave you feeling drowsy, try a new nutritional approach.   

Visit our vitamin product page and learn more about Natural Allergy Relief™ from the science of Dr. Robert Keller.   This daily supplement helps to address seasonal allergies at the cause (histamine production) rather than treating the symptoms exclusively. Click the banner below to visit our product page, or email us at: info@RobKellerMD.com for more information about Natural Allergy Relief™

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Antioxidants, Probiotics, Recipes and Nutrition
Summer is here and we’re busy making plans for barbecues, picnics and outdoor fun.  As the days get longer and warmer, our activity levels often increase and our dietary needs change.  Some of the important things to remember are to maintain a balanced diet, to avoid dehydration, and to try to choose proteins and carbohydrates that require less energy to metabolize. Oh yes, and remember to use sunscreen!  Did you know that recent studies suggest augmenting sunscreens with antioxidants to boost immunity to sun damage?

Summertime offers us a wealth of choices for fresh produce, and buying foods in season provides optimal flavor and lower prices.  Visit farmers markets and roadside stands or even your local supermarket for healthy fruits and vegetables that are perfect for summertime meals and snacks.  Some of the best at this time of year are summer squash, broccoli, cauliflower, corn, apples, pears, plums, grapes, strawberries and melons.

Have you ever tried frozen grapes on a hot summer day?  They’re sweet and refreshing, and so good for you! Here are some more summer treats that offer health benefits along with great taste.
  1. Sweet summer corn contains the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which can help to protect your eyes from the sun’s damaging rays.
  2. Watermelon is about 90% water and helps to keep you hydrated while satisfying hunger with minimal calories.
  3. Tangy and refreshing, raspberries are a great source of dietary fiber and they contain pectin, which helps lower cholesterol.
  4. Tropical fruits contain vitamins, antioxidants and enzymes. Pineapples contain bromelain, an enzyme that helps to digest proteins. Oranges are a good source of potassium, which can lower the risk of high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease.
  5. Cauliflower is the new superstar in healthy foods. You’ll find it in everything from cauliflower fried “rice” to cauliflower pizza dough, and pureed, it’s a wonderful substitute for mashed potatoes.
  6. Iced coffee. Yes, really. While caffeinated beverages act as diuretics and in quantity can lead to dehydration, a single cup of coffee each day may reduce the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer by about 10%. And a frosty glass of iced coffee on a hot day is heavenly.
  7. When grilling burgers, try using lean ground meat and whole wheat buns; add unexpected toppings such as guacamole, pineapple slices and feta cheese. These substitutions can reduce fats which require more energy to digest and lead to increased body temperature.
  8. Instead of meats, there are other wonderful sources for proteins such as nuts, seeds, sprouts, beans, soy products, yogurt and cottage cheese.
  9. Adult beverages seem to go hand in hand with summer parties, but alcohol is a powerful diuretic. Alternating drinks with water or fruit juice can prevent dehydration.
On the subject of picnics and barbeques, it’s important to remember hot weather safety tips. Food spoils more quickly in the warm temperatures, especially on sun-filled patio buffets. Make sure grills and prep surfaces are cleaned often and foods are not left out in the sun.

Here’s to summer fun and great seasonal foods. Bon appetit!
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Antioxidants, Dr. Robert Keller, Uncategorized
Understanding the role of antioxidants in anti-aging and wellness is essential for everyone, whether you are in your early 20’s or late seventies.  Health starts at the cellular level and the most important thing you can do for your body is to ensure that you are eating a balanced, nutritious and well portioned diet. Free radicals are atoms that are created when oxygen in your body interacts with other molecules.  The reactive free radicals start a chain sequence that multiply themselves within the body, figuratively attacking other cells by affixing themselves to the membrane of healthy cells. 

Having a perfect diet does not mean you can adequately protect your body from free radicals, as they enter the body in a variety of ways including environmental pollutants (air, water and pesticides), processed foods and lifestyle habits including cigarette smoking.  When you hear about free radicals, it is important to understand that the damage they do to cells is substantial if not controlled or counteracted by your body’s best and only defense against the destruction of healthy cells; antioxidants.

Vitamins such as vitamin E, beta-carotene and vitamin C combat free radicals. Selenium is a trace metal that also has an important role in antioxidant functioning.  Vitamin E can be acquired in a natural diet that is rich in nuts, certain vegetables, whole grains, apricots and some fruits.  Vitamin C (required for the production of vitamin A in the body) is present in citrus fruits, green peppers and leafy vegetables such as kale.  Beta carotene (retinol) is acquired in foods like carrots, broccoli, yams and cantaloupe.

The Link Between Antioxidants and Good Health

Consider your daily diet from an antioxidant perspective.  How many of these essential foods and nutrients are you receiving consistently to support the healthy antioxidant functioning that your body needs to combat cellular damage?  Health and wellness starts at the cellular level, and high quality nutritional supplements are an effective way to bridge the gap between the nutrients you eat daily and the full spectrum of vitamins and minerals your body needs consistently to combat free radicals and to promote a healthy immune system.

There are other aspects to managing your personal wellness, including hydration and regular exercise, but nutrition is the key to achieving and maintaining health at all ages and in every stage of life.  Dr. Robert Keller was passionate about educating others on the key role of antioxidants and healthy aging, and his research formulated a family of supplements designed to work synergistically to provide comprehensive nutritional support and cellular health. 

Learn more about Dr. Robert Keller and his research on our website. Start your own personal health revolution by emphasising nutrition and self-care every day.  Become an advocate for health and wellness and learn more about becoming an Affiliate with RobKellerMD®.
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Antioxidants, Dr. Robert Keller, Health
High blood pressure doesn’t seem like much to worry about.  When most people are diagnosed, few understand the concern that their physician has regarding side effects and complications because in the beginning, you feel few to no symptoms of the condition. And that’s what makes hypertension so dangerous.

There are a number of contributing factors that increase your risk for developing hypertension (high blood pressure), but lifestyle is by far the strongest influence.  What you eat, how often you exercise and your habits either support healthy blood pressure or contribute to elevated hypertension.   We’ll talk about some of the causes and what you (with the supervision of your family doctor) can do to manage it.

What Causes High Blood Pressure?

Essential hypertension can be an inherited problem where mostly men experience non-lifestyle related high blood pressure.  Individuals who are black have twice the risk of essential hypertension than white peers in similar age groups.  Black women over the age of 65 develop a higher incidence of hypertension than men. Lifestyle or chronic hypertension is related to diet, fitness, weight and age as well as ethnic background. Two numbers are provided to measure hypertension; the first being the systolic and the second the diastolic. The universal ranges for blood pressure are:
  1. Normal blood pressure is less than 120/80.
  2. Prehypertension is measured at 120-139/80-89
  3. Stage 1 of hypertension is: 140-159/90-99
  4. Stage 2 of hypertension is: 160/100+
  5. High blood pressure for seniors over 60 years of age is: 150+/90+
Regular blood pressure tests are recommended for individuals over the age of forty, but many physicians recommend an annual check for all adults over the age of twenty-five years.  If left untreated, hypertension can lead to a thickening of the arteries, cardiac distress, and other medical conditions.

Changes that Support Healthy Blood Pressure

It should be noted that hypertension is a serious health concern that requires the ongoing medical supervision of a trained physician.  In addition to supervision by a medical doctor, there are some known lifestyle changes proven to support the regulation of healthy blood pressure.

  • Reduce Sodium Intake
  • Reduce Caffeine
  • Manage Stress Levels
  • Exercise More Often
  • Maintain a Healthy Body Weight
  • Check Blood Pressure Regularly
  • Reduce High Fat Foods

A consultation with a wellness practitioner can help identify individual lifestyle habits and routines that may be contributing to hypertension.  Working in conjunction with a family doctor and medication, most individuals can restore their body to a healthy blood pressure. Remember that healthy changes maintained over time result in better health and wellness.  Persistence is the key (making the changes stick for the long term) and a positive outlook that makes your personal health and wellness a priority.
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Antioxidants, Health, Recipes and Nutrition

We may be able to reduce the signs of aging in our bodies through staying fit and taking care of our skin, but how can we prevent our brains from showing those signs? Research has shown that an age-related decrease in brain function is something that can be reduced.   Your brain, like your heart, needs a certain mix of nutrients for optimal functioning, including proteins, sugars, and healthy fats. While regular social interaction and physical and mental activity are also very important for maintaining good brain function, we may be able to increase the chances of keeping our brains healthy and fit by adding some brain-boosting foods to our diet.

 

Antioxidants help your body fight off infection and may reduce the risk of strokes and heart disease. They also can reduce the damage that free radicals can cause to the sensitive tissues of the brain, and promote healthy blood flow to the brain. A recent study showed that seniors who ate more antioxidant-rich foods such as cruciferous vegetables and leafy greens retained a slightly younger mental age than others who did not eat many such vegetables.

Continue reading “Boosting Brain Health With Antioxidants” »

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Antioxidants, Health

With the hectic pace of life and work these days, it can be tough to keep going; many of us feel that we run out of energy over the course of a workday. That mid-afternoon slump sends many of us reaching for a temporary boost of sugar and caffeine from coffee and energy drinks, but this can cause more problems later. Too much caffeine can disrupt sleep patterns and leave you feeling jumpy and nervous; too much sugar brings a host of problems all its own, from weight gain to tooth decay.


So how can we stay on top of our daily work routines and have enough energy left over to manage busy home lives as well? Keeping your body fueled with healthy food is one sure way to lift your energy levels. Remembering a few simple guidelines can help you make healthier choices at mealtimes and prevent that run-down feeling.

Continue reading “Eating Right for Improved Energy” »

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