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Health, Life Balance
There are moments when you may feel as though you are running low on energy.  When you have had a busy day, or perhaps a fun-packed weekend full of physical activity, it’s easy to understand why you may feel tired.  But what if that tired feeling doesn’t go away?  And what if your lack of energy is having a noticeable impact on your mood, or irritability? There are many factors that can contribute to fatigue, but some of the most overlooked causes are frequently hydration and nutrition.  It is almost as though eating well, and getting enough water each day is “too simple” to be the root cause of any of our health concerns. Find out which vitamins and nutrient deficiencies may be contributing to changes in mood or energy, and discuss your nutritional needs with your physician for recommendations.

Calcium
Inside the body, calcium has a greater function than simply building and maintaining bones.  Did you know that calcium is a key component to building blood vessels, and is also important to reducing symptoms and risks for Type 2 diabetics? Not only is calcium required for internal health, chronic low levels of calcium in the body are linked to depression in women, and exacerbation of pre-menstrual syndrome irritability and moods.  Estrogen is related to calcium production, and some studies have shown improvement with diet and supplementation.  The average recommended amount of calcium for adults is approximately 1,000 mg. per day.

Target Foods:  Milk, kale, yogurt, bok choy, broccoli, okra, and almonds.

Iron
Without sufficient amounts of iron in your body, cells lose the ability to transport oxygen and build strong muscles.  Not only is iron a little more difficult to acquire from dietary sources (particularly for vegans or vegetarians), but there are certain health conditions that can actually impair the absorption of iron into the body, including thalassemia, sickle cell disease, and certain types of cancer.  Eating fruit with your iron supplement, or adding honey or molasses to high-iron foods can aid in absorption, according to the Iron Disorders Institute. Problems with iron deficiency are more prevalent in women than they are in men.   Symptoms of low iron can include depression, fatigue and lethargy.  The recommended amount of iron per day for women is 18 mg., and men should average 8 mg. per day.

Target Foods:  Spinach, seafood, beef, chicken, pork and legumes. A multivitamin like Advanced Immune Defense™ can help bridge the gap between daily dietary nutrition, and the vitamins and nutrients your body needs to help stay active, energetic and healthy.  

Next time you are at the doctor’s office, review your supplement needs with your primary care advisory, and share Advanced Immune Defense™ on our website, to see if our daily multivitamin is right for you.    
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